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August 4, 2017
Q&A: Broadway Bound Theatre Festival Playwrights on Their Work – Part 5

In a FringeNYC-less summer, other theater festivals promoting the work of up-and-coming artists are taking the lead, including the Ice Factory Festival at New Ohio, the Corkscrew Theater Festival at the Paradise Factory, and the UNFringed Festival, at the Secret Theatre. Here, we talk to two of the playwrights participating in the Broadway Bound Theatre Festival, a brand new festival whose aim is to help turn playwrights into producers. (See our previous interviews with Broadway Bound artists here.)

Brian Kettler on Poor Boys' Chorus

Tuesday, August 15, 4 PM; Friday, August 18, 7:30 PM; Sunday, August 20, 3:00 PM

Tell us about your play!

Poor Boys’ Chorus is a coming of age love story that is timeless, magical and highly theatrical. Annabel, the richest girl in town, strikes up a friendship with Steeds, a poor orphan. A carnival sweeps through town featuring the mysterious illusionist, Bill the Magnificent. A chorus of three boys guides the audience through the story as plans are hatched, promises are broken and innocent mistakes have tragic results. Poor Boys’ Chorus is about the joys of first love, the sadness of summer slipping away and the dangers of flying a little too close to the sun.

What have been the most exciting things about seeing your show come together?

Seeing the energy and dedication of talented young artists creating brand new work. I don’t live in New York, but have been able to follow the rehearsal process through Facebook, which has been thrilling. I can’t wait to see the show!

Who are your favorite playwrights, past and present?

Fin Kennedy, Kirk Lynn, Diana Small, Andrea Stolowitz, Young Jean Lee.

What famous (or not so famous) line do you wish you’d written?

“A joke that feeds on ignorance starves its audience. We have the choice. We can say something or we can say nothing.” Comedians, Trevor Griffiths.

What would you change about the current state of theater?

I think every time a playwright submits to a festival, fellowship, contest, etc., they should get written feedback on their script from the organization they submitted to. Any time a theater has included some kind of feedback with a rejection, even if it’s just a few lines, I’ve found it to be extraordinarily helpful and meaningful.

How important is it to you that your work relate to our current political/social climate?

Very important. The most important. It’s a shitty time to be a human, but a great time to be an artist! As a writer, I’ve felt totally energized our current political and antisocial climate. I want to protest, fight, scream and kick! (But just with words, of course.)


Chuck Muckle on Running for My Life

Friday, August 18, 4 PM; Saturday, August 19, 7 PM; Sunday, August 20, 11:30 AM

Tell us about your play!

Running for My Life is basically a family drama set in the 80s and 90s about loss, trying to cope and moving on; Jay Chas, the main character, and Lare, his boyfriend, are having relationship issues, which get pushed to an extreme; and there is the death of the father of the family, who reappears to make peace with his son.

What have been the most exciting things about seeing your show come together?

One of the most exciting things about seeing the show come together is how much the actors bring to the characters and situations at hand.  They are all wonderfully creative and a joy to work with. And they have been fascinated with the breaking-the-wall elements in this play, the weaving in and out of realities, and how best to bring truth to those.

Who are your favorite playwrights, past and present?

Favorite playwrights, past and present: Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, Arthur Miller...am fond of the old standards!

What famous (or not so famous) line do you wish you’d written?

Am fond of so many lines..."George and Martha, sad, sad, sad"  (Virginia Woolf) comes to mind.

What would you change about the current state of theater?

I would deconstruct the whole setup of Broadway/Off Broadway and make it more affordable to the masses; lower costs, lower priced tickets.  Britain has always had it all over America when it comes to that, plus they have hundreds of years of tradition, so theatre is built into the culture.  Here is has become a luxury...and that only is more reinforced by higher and higher ticket prices for no good reason except someone's greed.

How important is it to you that your work relate to our current political/social climate?

It's often satisfying when theatre has political/social overtones, but I I don't think it's always necessary.  Running from My Life deals with a gay relationship and it's not a coming-out play, or an AIDS play (though AIDS is touched upon since one can't deal with the 80s and 90s without including that subject somehow).  A family drama with folks dealing with what they've been dealt is always timely, I would say.

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Q&A: Broadway Bound Theatre Festival Playwrights on Their Work – Part 4

By Hanna Oldsman

In a FringeNYC-less summer, other theater festivals promoting the work of up-and-coming artists are taking the lead, including the Ice Factory Festival at New Ohio, the Corkscrew Theater Festival at the Paradise Factory, and the UNFringed Festival, at the Secret Theatre. Here, we talk to two of the playwrights participating in the Broadway Bound Theatre Festival, a brand new festival whose aim is to help turn playwrights into producers. (See our previous interviews with Broadway Bound artists here.) Craig Donnelly on Adam and Brian Monday, August 7, 12:30 PM; Wednesday, August 9, 7:30 PM; Sunday, August 13, 3 PM Tell us about your play! Adam & Brian is about a typical gay couple living in New York City whose lives have been forever changed because of a brutal assault by three thugs. In the aftermath, the men are at odds with how to regain their inner stabilities. As they physically heal, their emotional wounds do not, challenging their commitment to each other. What have been the most exciting things about seeing your show come together? Seeing something I’ve created, come to fruition, has been an incredible experience. I’m so proud of the journey that this play has had, throug …Read more

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